teaberryblue: (Default)

So, I don’t do this as often as I used to, but this one has really given me some food for thought. Eug and I went to see Oz: The Great and Powerful on Friday night.  And while overall, I liked it, and thought it was a well-made movie, there were a few things about it that distressed me.

Elizabeth Rappe over at Jezebel already wrote quite a lovely article  about this already, but I feel like while she set up the history and talked about Baum’s own political leanings, there’s a lot of individual points about this new movie itself that don’t find their way into her piece.  Which is good: she’s working with a very specific thesis.

The short version: Baum was very much a feminist, his stories all focused on strong female characters and gender identity in a way that we would probably find revolutionary even today.  Oz: The Great and Powerful ignores all of that to make a movie about a man coming into his own in typical hero’s journey fashion, in a quest that requires him to overpower women who are much more powerful than he is.  It’s like the Grendel’s Mother of twee fantasy, here.  The scariest monsters are always ladies, gentlemen.

I mean, now I’m getting off the trajectory of Ms. Rappe’s argument, but that’s fine.  That was my point here.

So, let’s talk about OZ.  And let’s talk about OZ in the context of modern children’s fantasy.

(Be warned:  There are spoilers.  And lots of ‘em.) )

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

teaberryblue: (Default)

So, I don’t do this as often as I used to, but this one has really given me some food for thought. Eug and I went to see Oz: The Great and Powerful on Friday night.  And while overall, I liked it, and thought it was a well-made movie, there were a few things about it that distressed me.

Elizabeth Rappe over at Jezebel already wrote quite a lovely article  about this already, but I feel like while she set up the history and talked about Baum’s own political leanings, there’s a lot of individual points about this new movie itself that don’t find their way into her piece.  Which is good: she’s working with a very specific thesis.

The short version: Baum was very much a feminist, his stories all focused on strong female characters and gender identity in a way that we would probably find revolutionary even today.  Oz: The Great and Powerful ignores all of that to make a movie about a man coming into his own in typical hero’s journey fashion, in a quest that requires him to overpower women who are much more powerful than he is.  It’s like the Grendel’s Mother of twee fantasy, here.  The scariest monsters are always ladies, gentlemen.

I mean, now I’m getting off the trajectory of Ms. Rappe’s argument, but that’s fine.  That was my point here.

So, let’s talk about OZ.  And let’s talk about OZ in the context of modern children’s fantasy.

(Be warned:  There are spoilers.  And lots of ‘em.) )

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

Starchaser

Dec. 31st, 2012 04:02 am
teaberryblue: (Default)

It’s been a while. Hmm.

Years ago, when I first heard Christina Perri’s “Jar of Hearts,” I misheard the lyric “runnin’ round leaving scars” as “runnin’ round chasing stars.”

How? I have no idea, since those things really have nothing to do with each other. I realized almost immediately that I’d misheard the song, but sometimes I found myself singing that lyric anyway, because conceptually, I liked it better.

A couple of months ago, I posted this on Facebook one day when I overheard the song in a store.

I was talking to Aleph about it for a while after and he encouraged me to actually write the rest of the lyrics. I started that day. I’ve been working on it on and off for months and I intended to have it done for his birthday, but…that didn’t quite happen. A bunch of you have heard me mention time spent singing into my computer lately, and…this is what I was talking about. I have probably spent a lot of time doing this when I should have been sleeping. Writing new lyrics to a song that already exists is hard. Writing them when they are not a parody is even harder.

It’s apropos because Aleph is one of the most persistently positive and imaginative and unconditionally loving people I know. He is the sort of person who really makes you believe magic things can happen. And on top of that, alternate universes. They’re kind of a thing for us. <3 <3 <3

Starchaser

So here you go. Happy belated birthday, and happy New Year, and all kinds of things.

The song in question is exactly in the weakest part of my range, so I fiddled with it a lot and angsted over getting the vocals perfect and then finally accepted that if I kept trying, they wouldn’t ever get there and this would never leave my computer. Fortunately there are a lot of karaoke tracks on Spotify. I suppose this isn’t technically a legal use of them, but I don’t intend to make any money off it and it’s a gift for a friend.

And it’s a good way to end the year. On a high note. That might be a little too high for me to sing. But it was fun to do and made me wonder about that other world.

Love you all!

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

Starchaser

Dec. 31st, 2012 04:02 am
teaberryblue: (Default)

It’s been a while. Hmm.

Years ago, when I first heard Christina Perri’s “Jar of Hearts,” I misheard the lyric “runnin’ round leaving scars” as “runnin’ round chasing stars.”

How? I have no idea, since those things really have nothing to do with each other. I realized almost immediately that I’d misheard the song, but sometimes I found myself singing that lyric anyway, because conceptually, I liked it better.

A couple of months ago, I posted this on Facebook one day when I overheard the song in a store.

I was talking to Aleph about it for a while after and he encouraged me to actually write the rest of the lyrics. I started that day. I’ve been working on it on and off for months and I intended to have it done for his birthday, but…that didn’t quite happen. A bunch of you have heard me mention time spent singing into my computer lately, and…this is what I was talking about. I have probably spent a lot of time doing this when I should have been sleeping. Writing new lyrics to a song that already exists is hard. Writing them when they are not a parody is even harder.

It’s apropos because Aleph is one of the most persistently positive and imaginative and unconditionally loving people I know. He is the sort of person who really makes you believe magic things can happen. And on top of that, alternate universes. They’re kind of a thing for us. <3 <3 <3

Starchaser

So here you go. Happy belated birthday, and happy New Year, and all kinds of things.

The song in question is exactly in the weakest part of my range, so I fiddled with it a lot and angsted over getting the vocals perfect and then finally accepted that if I kept trying, they wouldn’t ever get there and this would never leave my computer. Fortunately there are a lot of karaoke tracks on Spotify. I suppose this isn’t technically a legal use of them, but I don’t intend to make any money off it and it’s a gift for a friend.

And it’s a good way to end the year. On a high note. That might be a little too high for me to sing. But it was fun to do and made me wonder about that other world.

Love you all!

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

teaberryblue: (Default)

Jess and I got tickets to see a preview screening of Men in Black III last night at the Museum of the Moving Image, followed by a talk by movie makeup legend Rick Baker.

Full disclosure: I found the first MIB movie enjoyable if a bit short to justify the cost of a movie ticket.  I never saw the second one.  But Jess had been talking about how disappointed she was that we got no MIB trailer when we went to see The Avengers, so I figured she might like this sort of thing, and I knew I would like listening to Rick Baker even if the movie was disappointing.

In the end, and without spoiling, I thought the movie was fine.  There was one comic relief character whom I felt was way overused to the detriment of the film, and I think there was only one female character of note in the entire film, which is kind of…disappointing.  There were lots of female bit parts, but only one woman who appeared in multiple scenes, and only one of the substantial bit parts was a female character.  I also felt like the ending was a bit of a copout– there was a different ending that I thought that they were going for, that would have been a gutsy ending to the film, and they didn’t go there, which was sort of a letdown for me.   But there were lots of pretty aliens and such, some very good comedy, and some good acting moments.

Rick Baker was fascinating, and he told wonderful stories. He is one of those people who can take questions from an audience and transform them– it didn’t seem to matter how irritating the question was, whether it was a question someone else had already asked, whether he’d already basically said the answer, whether it was clearly a question designed to show off the questioner’s knowledge more than to ask a question; he fielded them all with grace and with the kind of creative storytelling that made every single one of his answers fascinating.  He talked about having to turn down the opportunity to work on Edward Scissorhands in order to do some movie that he didn’t find particularly good.  He talked about doing monster makeup in his bedroom as a child. He talked about meeting Michael Jackson and working on Thriller, and actually seeing a crowd of zombies dancing, live.

The 3-D glasses we used were a cut above the ones you normally get at theaters. They had a security tag in them, and a warning not to steal them, and that they don’t protect from UV rays, because that is what I have come to expect from 3-D glasses.  They were also, and I was most excited about this, the traditional blue-and-red style 3D glasses, just…amped up.  But one lens was red and one lens was blue and I was very excited by that!

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

teaberryblue: (Default)

Jess and I got tickets to see a preview screening of Men in Black III last night at the Museum of the Moving Image, followed by a talk by movie makeup legend Rick Baker.

Full disclosure: I found the first MIB movie enjoyable if a bit short to justify the cost of a movie ticket.  I never saw the second one.  But Jess had been talking about how disappointed she was that we got no MIB trailer when we went to see The Avengers, so I figured she might like this sort of thing, and I knew I would like listening to Rick Baker even if the movie was disappointing.

In the end, and without spoiling, I thought the movie was fine.  There was one comic relief character whom I felt was way overused to the detriment of the film, and I think there was only one female character of note in the entire film, which is kind of…disappointing.  There were lots of female bit parts, but only one woman who appeared in multiple scenes, and only one of the substantial bit parts was a female character.  I also felt like the ending was a bit of a copout– there was a different ending that I thought that they were going for, that would have been a gutsy ending to the film, and they didn’t go there, which was sort of a letdown for me.   But there were lots of pretty aliens and such, some very good comedy, and some good acting moments.

Rick Baker was fascinating, and he told wonderful stories. He is one of those people who can take questions from an audience and transform them– it didn’t seem to matter how irritating the question was, whether it was a question someone else had already asked, whether he’d already basically said the answer, whether it was clearly a question designed to show off the questioner’s knowledge more than to ask a question; he fielded them all with grace and with the kind of creative storytelling that made every single one of his answers fascinating.  He talked about having to turn down the opportunity to work on Edward Scissorhands in order to do some movie that he didn’t find particularly good.  He talked about doing monster makeup in his bedroom as a child. He talked about meeting Michael Jackson and working on Thriller, and actually seeing a crowd of zombies dancing, live.

The 3-D glasses we used were a cut above the ones you normally get at theaters. They had a security tag in them, and a warning not to steal them, and that they don’t protect from UV rays, because that is what I have come to expect from 3-D glasses.  They were also, and I was most excited about this, the traditional blue-and-red style 3D glasses, just…amped up.  But one lens was red and one lens was blue and I was very excited by that!

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

teaberryblue: (Default)

The two theater employees following me in at the end there were awesome! We chatted and took photos together and the guy was a huge Hunger Games fan; he introduced himself as “the Career Tribute from District 3″ and was teaching all his coworkers how to do the District 12 salute.

If you want to keep up to date on what’s going on with the documentary, go like Troubled Girl Films!!!

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

teaberryblue: (Default)

The two theater employees following me in at the end there were awesome! We chatted and took photos together and the guy was a huge Hunger Games fan; he introduced himself as “the Career Tribute from District 3″ and was teaching all his coworkers how to do the District 12 salute.

If you want to keep up to date on what’s going on with the documentary, go like Troubled Girl Films!!!

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

Ugly Stuff

Mar. 27th, 2012 08:15 pm
teaberryblue: (Default)

Note: there are spoilers for The Hunger Games in here, that I am trying to keep as vague as possible.

When I talk about racial issues on my blog, it’s largely because I have friends and family members who are people of color, and that to me means:

1) I want you guys to know you are not speaking into empty space.

and

2) When you love people, you support them.

I know my perspective is tinged with privilege, and I probably mess up sometimes, and it’s okay if you tell me I’m messing up, or if you’d rather I not talk about it.

The Hunger Games and Trayvon Martin )

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

Ugly Stuff

Mar. 27th, 2012 08:15 pm
teaberryblue: (Default)

Note: there are spoilers for The Hunger Games in here, that I am trying to keep as vague as possible.

When I talk about racial issues on my blog, it’s largely because I have friends and family members who are people of color, and that to me means:

1) I want you guys to know you are not speaking into empty space.

and

2) When you love people, you support them.

I know my perspective is tinged with privilege, and I probably mess up sometimes, and it’s okay if you tell me I’m messing up, or if you’d rather I not talk about it.

Today was a pretty gruesome day when you start talking about white attitudes toward black Americans. We had people trying to discredit and vilify a kid who was murdered, and we had people who decided a fictional child’s death didn’t matter because her skin was the wrong color.

And these two things are related, because SERIOUSLY. Both are people talking about the death of a black child. Both involve people trying to assign a value to a child’s life and finding ways to make that value less than the value of another child’s life. And that’s pretty sick.

I’m not a published author. I don’t know if I ever will be. But when I was a teenager, I had a play produced by an off-Broadway theater company. Of course, like every writer, I had images of the characters in my head. And like many white writers, I didn’t think to specify when I imagined a character was white, because to me, white was the default. I hope you will forgive me the fact that I was young and raised in a largely white community, and I’ve since learned differently. But I gave the theater a list of descriptions of the cast, where I thought it “mattered.”

They cast a Latina girl as the protagonist, which was exactly as I had imagined her. And they cast a black boy as her romantic interest, which was not. Because I’d imagined him white. And fourteen year old me reacted a little twitchily to the idea that this wasn’t the picture of my male lead I’d had in my head. I probably had some racist inhibitions about this casting at the time, I’ll admit. And I didn’t know about things like unpacking my privilege at that age. I was just sitting there thinking, “wait, that’s not what he was supposed to look like.”

The actor was phenomenal. The two leads were both phenomenal. Getting to see my play onstage was one of the highlights of my young life, but the boy who played that character understood him so perfectly that his performance was illuminating to me as the very young writer. And I will now never be able to see that character as anyone but the young actor who portrayed him when I was fourteen. And he’s the only character I feel that for, out of the twelve characters in the play.

Yeah, I know this reads a bit like one of those white people “AND THEN I WASN’T RACIST FOREVER” things. But I felt like in the light of all this bullshit where people are shocked and dismayed and suddenly don’t care about a character’s death when they discover that that character was black, even when the author described her as black, it was worth bringing up the one experience with that that I have as an author. I don’t know if it helps. I don’t know if it does anything. It’s just one white writer’s experience.

I am getting the less horrific issue out of the way. Because I want to talk about the more horrific issue.

Since yesterday, people and news sources have been trying to “discredit” a dead child. A DEAD CHILD. Because obviously, if the dead child smoked weed, he deserved to die. If the dead child punched a man who was STALKING HIM, he deserved to die. If the dead child tried to grab the gun of a man who STALKED HIM WITH A GUN, he deserved to die.

Let’s go over this.

–If any kid who has ever smoked pot deserves to get shot, most of the people I know would not have made it to adulthood.
–Furthermore, no one had proven that Trayvon Martin had any pot. I am willing to stake money that if his EMPTY PLASTIC BAG were tested for traces of Pepperidge Farm Goldfish Crackers, it would come back positive.
–WHICH DOESN’T MATTER BECAUSE SMOKING POT DOES NOT MEAN YOU DESERVE TO BE TERRORIZED AND MURDERED.
–Oh my god, Trayvon Martin may or may not have acted like a tough guy on the internet. Do you know how many teenaged boys do that? ALL THE ONES WHO HAVE ACCESS TO CAMERAS.
–APPARENTLY ALL THE BOYS WHO HAVE ACCESS TO CAMERAS DESERVE TO DIE.
–Trayvon Martin may or may not have punched, kicked, beaten up, bitten, pulled George Zimmerman’s hair and given him a wedgie. Let’s go over this again. Facts that HAVE been corroborated: George Zimmerman followed Trayvon Martin in his car. Then he called the cops. He was told NOT TO FOLLOW THE KID. He got out of his car and followed him anyway. Let’s say you’re a teenager, and a man who is much bigger than you starts following you, first in a car and then on foot. Would you not be terrified? If you were physically strong enough that you thought punching him might help, WOULD YOU NOT PUNCH HIM? I know I would. I’ve never been big enough or strong enough, but there have been creepy dudes following me whom I totally would have punched if I thought it would help matters.
–Trayvon Martin may have tried to grab George Zimmerman’s gun. Look at this sentence. There is something very obvious implied in this sentence. What is that thing? OH YEAH. THAT THING IS THAT GEORGE ZIMMERMAN HAD HIS GUN OUT WHERE THIS KID COULD SEE IT. So you’re walking home and some strange man who is much bigger that you is following you…WITH A GUN. What the heck would you do? Would it not be utterly reasonable to try to get the gun away?

I remember that I was nine years old when Tawana Brawley was raped. I remember seeing the photos of the pretty young woman who was not that much older than me, but at nine, she seemed like the kind of poised, sophisticated teenager I hoped to be. I didn’t really understand what rape was. I understood she had been attacked. And at first, people were supporting her, but in my mostly-white community, people started saying awful, horrible things about her. As if she deserved what happened to her. As if she would lie about what happened. As if she had a reason to lie. I remember not understanding; I remember asking why she would do that. And I remember growing up and seeing more and more young women discredited when they said they had been raped or sexually assaulted, shamed into believing it was their fault, shamed into retracting accusations, and then being turned into a pariah, told that they were the reason “innocent” women were raped, they were the reason “innocent” women were afraid to come forward.

It was my first real experience in seeing how racism could vilify a child. And yesterday and today, every time I see another article trying to discredit a dead boy who was murdered, and whose murderer has yet to be arrested, I feel the same thing I did then. I have more understanding now than I did at nine, but the chill in my bones is the same one.

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

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When I was twenty years old, while I was working on a student film, I was in a serious accident that nearly cost me the use of my right arm. Part of the upshot of this accident was that I had unintentionally trespassed on public property that was not well-marked as being off limits.

This was in the days before everyone had a cellphone. The friend I was with had luckily done EMT training and was able to do some preliminary care for me, get information like my blood type, etc, in case I passed out, before trying to flag down a car for help.

When the ambulance came, they were accompanied by a state trooper. The trooper was very kind to me, and assured me that he knew I hadn’t done anything wrong, and that he would testify to that end in court, but unfortunately, since I had technically committed a misdemeanor, I had to be arrested. He was as nice as humanly possible about it, and did the paperwork at the hospital, so that I didn’t have to go to the police station, but when I was twenty years old, I was arrested for accidentally trespassing on public property.

I think about this every single time I hear that George Zimmerman still has not been arrested for murdering a child.

You kill another person, you get arrested. If you’re innocent, or defending yourself, (neither of which I believe about Zimmerman) you prove that in court. That is what court is for. I went to court, I explained to the judge what had happened, the judge kind of laughed at me, asked how my arm was, made me promise not to sue the state, and dismissed the charges.

I unwittingly trespassed on public property, got severely injured, and was arrested.

The guy who sent a non-specific threatening email to the Sanford police chief, Bill Lee, has been arrested.

The guy who murdered an unarmed teenager has not been arrested.

This is hideously wrong.

I’ve been trying to figure out for a while now what to say about this. I’ve been saying a lot about it in person, but not a lot on the internet. Sometimes I don’t want to add more noise to drown out the signal, especially when I see white people co-opting the death of a young boy to further their own messages, and I don’t want to be part of that. I want to listen to what the people who are really being affected by this have to say. But I feel compelled to say something. In some ways I feel like waiting to say something until I could figure out what to say is problematic in itself, because we all need to speak out when horrors are committed. And I feel like a cad when horrible things are happening and I’m posting cute photos of myself going to movies.

Other people have spoken about this a bit, but I’m frustrated and angry when I see other white people pulling the “I am Trayvon Martin” thing, because it’s so dismissive of the real issue, which is that we’re not Trayvon Martin. None of us ever will be. We’re George Zimmerman. Even if we don’t go out and shoot kids for fun, when we allow the images in the media to perpetuate the idea that young black men are violent, when our own speech (I don’t want to talk about the conversation I had to have at lunch today) perpetuates an idea of black Americans as criminals, especially young black American men, we are accessories to murder. We are creating people like George Zimmerman. That’s on us. And it doesn’t matter if we have black friends, or black relatives, or black ancestors– that doesn’t absolve us. In fact, it’s worse when we do, and say nothing, because it’s our loved ones who are suffering and we’re not doing anything to ease that.

In the end, I think that’s why I keep thinking about the time I was arrested. Because I don’t have a right to compare myself to a kid whose life was in danger simply because he dared to buy some Skittles and go for a walk. I can compare myself to the man who took his life. The difference being that the only criminal act I’ve ever committed harmed no one but myself, and of the two of us, I’m the one who’s been arrested. I’m not trying to make this about me– It’s not. I’m using myself as an example because I know the details of the story, and I know what happened. I’m not angry that I was arrested. I get what I did wrong, and that that’s the way it’s supposed to go.I’m angry that apparently murdering a young boy isn’t as serious an offense as walking onto a bridge when the pedestrian walkway is closed, if the boy in question is black.

For those of you who thought this was a lone case of crazy, or who are trying to deal with people who claim that:
22 year old Rekia Boyd died on Thursday after being shot by an off-duty cop.
18 year old Ramarley Graham was murdered by a New York City cop in a “drug bust” (though they had no warrant to enter the home, and I’ve heard conflicting stories about whether there were any drugs present at all) just a couple of weeks before Trayvon Martin.

Love to all of you.

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

teaberryblue: (Default)

When I was twenty years old, while I was working on a student film, I was in a serious accident that nearly cost me the use of my right arm. Part of the upshot of this accident was that I had unintentionally trespassed on public property that was not well-marked as being off limits.

This was in the days before everyone had a cellphone. The friend I was with had luckily done EMT training and was able to do some preliminary care for me, get information like my blood type, etc, in case I passed out, before trying to flag down a car for help.

When the ambulance came, they were accompanied by a state trooper. The trooper was very kind to me, and assured me that he knew I hadn’t done anything wrong, and that he would testify to that end in court, but unfortunately, since I had technically committed a misdemeanor, I had to be arrested. He was as nice as humanly possible about it, and did the paperwork at the hospital, so that I didn’t have to go to the police station, but when I was twenty years old, I was arrested for accidentally trespassing on public property.

I think about this every single time I hear that George Zimmerman still has not been arrested for murdering a child.

You kill another person, you get arrested. If you’re innocent, or defending yourself, (neither of which I believe about Zimmerman) you prove that in court. That is what court is for. I went to court, I explained to the judge what had happened, the judge kind of laughed at me, asked how my arm was, made me promise not to sue the state, and dismissed the charges.

I unwittingly trespassed on public property, got severely injured, and was arrested.

The guy who sent a non-specific threatening email to the Sanford police chief, Bill Lee, has been arrested.

The guy who murdered an unarmed teenager has not been arrested.

This is hideously wrong.

I’ve been trying to figure out for a while now what to say about this. I’ve been saying a lot about it in person, but not a lot on the internet. Sometimes I don’t want to add more noise to drown out the signal, especially when I see white people co-opting the death of a young boy to further their own messages, and I don’t want to be part of that. I want to listen to what the people who are really being affected by this have to say. But I feel compelled to say something. In some ways I feel like waiting to say something until I could figure out what to say is problematic in itself, because we all need to speak out when horrors are committed. And I feel like a cad when horrible things are happening and I’m posting cute photos of myself going to movies.

Other people have spoken about this a bit, but I’m frustrated and angry when I see other white people pulling the “I am Trayvon Martin” thing, because it’s so dismissive of the real issue, which is that we’re not Trayvon Martin. None of us ever will be. We’re George Zimmerman. Even if we don’t go out and shoot kids for fun, when we allow the images in the media to perpetuate the idea that young black men are violent, when our own speech (I don’t want to talk about the conversation I had to have at lunch today) perpetuates an idea of black Americans as criminals, especially young black American men, we are accessories to murder. We are creating people like George Zimmerman. That’s on us. And it doesn’t matter if we have black friends, or black relatives, or black ancestors– that doesn’t absolve us. In fact, it’s worse when we do, and say nothing, because it’s our loved ones who are suffering and we’re not doing anything to ease that.

In the end, I think that’s why I keep thinking about the time I was arrested. Because I don’t have a right to compare myself to a kid whose life was in danger simply because he dared to buy some Skittles and go for a walk. I can compare myself to the man who took his life. The difference being that the only criminal act I’ve ever committed harmed no one but myself, and of the two of us, I’m the one who’s been arrested. I’m not trying to make this about me– It’s not. I’m using myself as an example because I know the details of the story, and I know what happened. I’m not angry that I was arrested. I get what I did wrong, and that that’s the way it’s supposed to go.I’m angry that apparently murdering a young boy isn’t as serious an offense as walking onto a bridge when the pedestrian walkway is closed, if the boy in question is black.

For those of you who thought this was a lone case of crazy, or who are trying to deal with people who claim that:
22 year old Rekia Boyd died on Thursday after being shot by an off-duty cop.
18 year old Ramarley Graham was murdered by a New York City cop in a “drug bust” (though they had no warrant to enter the home, and I’ve heard conflicting stories about whether there were any drugs present at all) just a couple of weeks before Trayvon Martin.

Love to all of you.

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

teaberryblue: (Default)

So! Hunger Games!!!

Hansi, who is making the fanfiction documentary I have mentioned taking part in a couple times before, actually came to my apartment to film me and Jess getting ready. She wanted to do it cinema verite style, which basically means filming us doing what we normally do.

I’m used to being on camera for interviews, and I’m used to acting on camera, but trying to just do what you normally do when you’re aware you’re on camera is a really weird experience, because it makes you very conscious of things like the fact that conversational speech is nothing like anything sensical, especially when it’s people like me and Jess, who know each other so well that we talk in a lot of common assumptions. But it was still fun and I hope it’s useful for the film. We went out to the theater together, and Hansi filmed us in Times Square for a bit. She wanted to film inside the theater, but was worried she’d get kicked out with the camera, so I offered to go inside and ask someone.

I walk in, and I immediately get completely gushed over by three of the AMC theater team, who were like “OMG EFFIE.” One of them was like “HI I AM A CAREER TRIBUTE FROM DISTRICT THREE!!!” And they asked me for a photo, so I asked if we could come in and film. One of them was a manager and he was only too happy to let us in to film, as long as we didn’t get AMC logos on anything. Plus, I told them Katniss was there, too, and grabbed Jess for their photo as well. So that was great. While we were in there, a girl making a documentary for her NYU student project also asked to interview us, so we did that.

We also got asked for a bunch of photos from other people, which was super fun!

We had been told they were going to let people start lining up around ten, so that had been the plan to meet up, and since we had to do the stuff with Hansi, we had figured we’d go get some food, and then get on line, but just as we finished the interviews with the NYU project, we heard they had decided to let people line up early, so we got on the line. Jess was starving so she went back out to get some food, and then I needed to stretch my legs from sitting on the floor, so I went out just to walk around a little. I went outside and immediately more people wanted photos! So I did a bunch of photos, and then went back into the theater– when Jess texted that they had decided to let people hang out in the theater.

So we got in, got settled with pretty excellent seats, and then I went out and got us large refillable soda. I don’t normally do that because $5 for a soda, but I shared mine with Kate and we refilled it and stuff, because, two hours waiting in the theater? TOTALLY. Kate got there pretty soon after, and then Darryl did, and Darryl was kind enough to go out with us to take some photos of our costumes.

Which meant more people asked us for photos. I seriously don’t think I’ve done so many photos in my life. Plus, pretty much everyone kept squealing at me and saying “Happy Hunger Games!” and stuff, so it was kind of adorable. There were a lot of people dressed as Katniss, and a couple people in Capitol wear, and a couple people dressed as Peeta, but no one else dressed as Effie, so that worked out nicely. One of the Peetas actually had a loaf of bread he was running around with which was kind of adorable since he seemed to be a very energetic young man and was kind of all over the theater with the bread before the movie started.

Then was the movie!!! I was mostly pleased with it. There was one pretty major character moment that I wasn’t crazy about how they interpreted it, but other than that, I thoroughly enjoyed it. It wasn’t the best movie ever, but it was pretty solid as far as I’m concerned. Without doing anything that is really a spoiler (although I suspect there will be spoilers in the comments), I have to say that the single most impressive major change to me was how they portrayed Seneca Crane, who is an extraordinarily minor character in the books, and Wes Bentley just did a phenomenal job expanding him.

After the movie, we immediately got stopped by a guy from some website who wanted to interview me. It was three in the morning, dude. I was like, “sorry, but I need to get up in the morning, so I need to go home.” I guess people who do interviews like this are so used to people being excited about being on camera that it didn’t register that I was saying no, because he kept trying to explain what he wanted me to do. Finally I was like, “look, lots of people talked to me before the movie, and I would have been happy to talk to you then but now I need to go home and sleep.” He still seemed kinda incredulous.

The movie theater, who had done an AMAZING job with crowd control and managing lines for the wait to get in, utterly FAILED on getting people out. They clearly didn’t think about the fact that they had people for nine screenings all arriving over a three hour period, and then all leaving at THE EXACT SAME MOMENT. The escalator landing got so crowded people were running back up the down escalator. We decided not to risk it and instead waited ten minutes for an elevator. I felt a little bad for that interview guy, cause I could have done his interview, but I also would rather not appear in anything that involves people gawking at people who dress up in costumes, and you never know someone’s angle.

Anyway, we got outside, and more people wanted pictures, while we hailed a cab, and then took a cab just a few blocks across town to Kate’s car, as she was kind and lovely enough to drive us home, which also gave us time to discuss the movie.

Then I went ZZZZZZ and today was another day with less makeup!!!!

lots of photos!! )

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

teaberryblue: (Default)

So! Hunger Games!!!

Hansi, who is making the fanfiction documentary I have mentioned taking part in a couple times before, actually came to my apartment to film me and Jess getting ready. She wanted to do it cinema verite style, which basically means filming us doing what we normally do.

I’m used to being on camera for interviews, and I’m used to acting on camera, but trying to just do what you normally do when you’re aware you’re on camera is a really weird experience, because it makes you very conscious of things like the fact that conversational speech is nothing like anything sensical, especially when it’s people like me and Jess, who know each other so well that we talk in a lot of common assumptions. But it was still fun and I hope it’s useful for the film. We went out to the theater together, and Hansi filmed us in Times Square for a bit. She wanted to film inside the theater, but was worried she’d get kicked out with the camera, so I offered to go inside and ask someone.

I walk in, and I immediately get completely gushed over by three of the AMC theater team, who were like “OMG EFFIE.” One of them was like “HI I AM A CAREER TRIBUTE FROM DISTRICT THREE!!!” And they asked me for a photo, so I asked if we could come in and film. One of them was a manager and he was only too happy to let us in to film, as long as we didn’t get AMC logos on anything. Plus, I told them Katniss was there, too, and grabbed Jess for their photo as well. So that was great. While we were in there, a girl making a documentary for her NYU student project also asked to interview us, so we did that.

We also got asked for a bunch of photos from other people, which was super fun!

We had been told they were going to let people start lining up around ten, so that had been the plan to meet up, and since we had to do the stuff with Hansi, we had figured we’d go get some food, and then get on line, but just as we finished the interviews with the NYU project, we heard they had decided to let people line up early, so we got on the line. Jess was starving so she went back out to get some food, and then I needed to stretch my legs from sitting on the floor, so I went out just to walk around a little. I went outside and immediately more people wanted photos! So I did a bunch of photos, and then went back into the theater– when Jess texted that they had decided to let people hang out in the theater.

So we got in, got settled with pretty excellent seats, and then I went out and got us large refillable soda. I don’t normally do that because $5 for a soda, but I shared mine with Kate and we refilled it and stuff, because, two hours waiting in the theater? TOTALLY. Kate got there pretty soon after, and then Darryl did, and Darryl was kind enough to go out with us to take some photos of our costumes.

Which meant more people asked us for photos. I seriously don’t think I’ve done so many photos in my life. Plus, pretty much everyone kept squealing at me and saying “Happy Hunger Games!” and stuff, so it was kind of adorable. There were a lot of people dressed as Katniss, and a couple people in Capitol wear, and a couple people dressed as Peeta, but no one else dressed as Effie, so that worked out nicely. One of the Peetas actually had a loaf of bread he was running around with which was kind of adorable since he seemed to be a very energetic young man and was kind of all over the theater with the bread before the movie started.

Then was the movie!!! I was mostly pleased with it. There was one pretty major character moment that I wasn’t crazy about how they interpreted it, but other than that, I thoroughly enjoyed it. It wasn’t the best movie ever, but it was pretty solid as far as I’m concerned. Without doing anything that is really a spoiler (although I suspect there will be spoilers in the comments), I have to say that the single most impressive major change to me was how they portrayed Seneca Crane, who is an extraordinarily minor character in the books, and Wes Bentley just did a phenomenal job expanding him.

After the movie, we immediately got stopped by a guy from some website who wanted to interview me. It was three in the morning, dude. I was like, “sorry, but I need to get up in the morning, so I need to go home.” I guess people who do interviews like this are so used to people being excited about being on camera that it didn’t register that I was saying no, because he kept trying to explain what he wanted me to do. Finally I was like, “look, lots of people talked to me before the movie, and I would have been happy to talk to you then but now I need to go home and sleep.” He still seemed kinda incredulous.

The movie theater, who had done an AMAZING job with crowd control and managing lines for the wait to get in, utterly FAILED on getting people out. They clearly didn’t think about the fact that they had people for nine screenings all arriving over a three hour period, and then all leaving at THE EXACT SAME MOMENT. The escalator landing got so crowded people were running back up the down escalator. We decided not to risk it and instead waited ten minutes for an elevator. I felt a little bad for that interview guy, cause I could have done his interview, but I also would rather not appear in anything that involves people gawking at people who dress up in costumes, and you never know someone’s angle.

Anyway, we got outside, and more people wanted pictures, while we hailed a cab, and then took a cab just a few blocks across town to Kate’s car, as she was kind and lovely enough to drive us home, which also gave us time to discuss the movie.

Then I went ZZZZZZ and today was another day with less makeup!!!!

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

teaberryblue: (Default)

I have my nails done and am wearing some of my jewelries at work!!!

[livejournal.com profile] zia_narratora: (1:54:06 PM) HAPPY HUNGER GAMES
[livejournal.com profile] alephz: (1:54:11 PM) YYYYYYYYYY
[livejournal.com profile] alephz: (1:54:30 PM) TOO OLD TO GET SELECTED!
[livejournal.com profile] alephz: (1:54:35 PM) SUCK IT, THE YOUTH.




Spoilers for the whole damn series:




[livejournal.com profile] zia_narratora: (1:54:06 PM) HAPPY HUNGER GAMES
[livejournal.com profile] alephz: (1:54:11 PM) YYYYYYYYYY
[livejournal.com profile] alephz: (1:54:30 PM) TOO OLD TO GET SELECTED!
[livejournal.com profile] alephz: (1:54:35 PM) SUCK IT, THE YOUTH.
[livejournal.com profile] zia_narratora: (1:54:37 PM) HAHAHAHAHAHA
[livejournal.com profile] _samalander: (1:55:13 PM) YEAH FUCK YOU GUYS
[livejournal.com profile] _samalander: (1:55:18 PM) BRB WORKING IN THE MINES FOREVERS
[livejournal.com profile] alephz: (1:55:04 PM) I will now reap the benefits while you suffer and die.
[livejournal.com profile] _samalander: (1:55:58 PM) ALSO I WILL BET ON YOUR CONTINUED SURVIVAL
[livejournal.com profile] _samalander: (1:56:03 PM) AND MAYBE SEND YOU A COOKIE
[livejournal.com profile] zia_narratora: (1:56:10 PM) MAY THE ODDS BE EVER IN YOUR FAVOR
[livejournal.com profile] _samalander: (1:56:26 PM) THEY'RE ALREADY IN MINE
[livejournal.com profile] zia_narratora: (1:56:36 PM) WHERE I GET BLACK LUNG
[livejournal.com profile] _samalander: (1:56:56 PM) BETTER BLACK LUNG THAN STABBED THROUGH THE LUNG BY A LUNATIC FISHERBOY
[livejournal.com profile] zia_narratora: (1:57:51 PM) HAHAHA OMG FINNICK PUT THAT THING DOWN
[livejournal.com profile] _samalander: (1:58:06 PM) NO I'M BUSY
[livejournal.com profile] _samalander: (1:58:10 PM) MAKING LUNG SKEWERS
[livejournal.com profile] _samalander: (1:58:18 PM) ...YOU WANT ONE
[livejournal.com profile] _samalander: (1:58:21 PM) I HAVE EXTRA
[livejournal.com profile] zia_narratora: (1:58:26 PM) NO FINNICK YOU HAVE TO GO WHORE YOURSELF TO OLD LADIES NOW.
[livejournal.com profile] zia_narratora: (1:58:35 PM) ACTUALLY WALTER WOULD LIKE TO WRITE ABOUT YOU IN HIS BOOK.
[livejournal.com profile] _samalander: (1:58:47 PM) DO I HAVE TO SHOW HIM MY DOODLE
[livejournal.com profile] zia_narratora: (1:58:57 PM) YES
[livejournal.com profile] zia_narratora: (1:59:07 PM) WE BOUGHT YOU A MANSION GODDAMN IT.
[livejournal.com profile] _samalander: (1:59:18 PM) I KILLED 23 PEOPLE FOR THAT MANSION
[livejournal.com profile] _samalander: (1:59:26 PM) I BET YOUR LUNGS ARE DELICIOUS



Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

teaberryblue: (Default)

I have my nails done and am wearing some of my jewelries at work!!!

[info]zia_narratora: (1:54:06 PM) HAPPY HUNGER GAMES
[info]alephz: (1:54:11 PM) YYYYYYYYYY
[info]alephz: (1:54:30 PM) TOO OLD TO GET SELECTED!
[info]alephz: (1:54:35 PM) SUCK IT, THE YOUTH.

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

teaberryblue: (Default)

Hi, everyone!

As some of you may know, Hansi Oppenheimer is creating a documentary about fanfiction, and largely looking at the benefits of creative fandom– which is something that is definitely needed. She interviewed me a couple of weeks ago, and here’s a clip from that interview which I am very excited to share with all of you.

If any of you are in the NYC area or close to New York and would like to be part of this, or know someone who might, or if you would like to know more, please contact Hansi by email. She was a pleasure to work with and I’m excited to be part of this project!!!

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

teaberryblue: (Default)

Hi, everyone!

As some of you may know, Hansi Oppenheimer is creating a documentary about fanfiction, and largely looking at the benefits of creative fandom– which is something that is definitely needed. She interviewed me a couple of weeks ago, and here’s a clip from that interview which I am very excited to share with all of you.

If any of you are in the NYC area or close to New York and would like to be part of this, or know someone who might, or if you would like to know more, please contact Hansi by email. She was a pleasure to work with and I’m excited to be part of this project!!!

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

teaberryblue: (Default)

I wrote a little bit about Harry Potter the other night. Here’s a little bit more.

I didn’t read any Harry Potter books until 2001. That’s, holy crap, ten years ago now. I had no interest in the books. My only experience with them was that they seemed to be read by a lot of elementary school kids who had an attitude about how they ONLY read Harry Potter, and nothing else. So that had kind of turned me off of having much interest in the series.

But then, one day at work, a friend and coworker who was almost 40 and had impeccable taste in most media– and was one of those people who was excellent at recommending things that would be in the taste of the person to whom he was recommending, which I think is an even more valuable skill, said he was shocked I hadn’t read them. He told me that they would be absolutely the most important books I ever read– not from a “quality of story” perspective but from a “value of social phenomenon” perspective.

So I capitulated and read the first one. I remember thinking it was okay, and mostly perceiving it as a Roald Dahl ripoff…it reminded me a heckuva lot of Matilda, especially in the earliest chapters. I told him so, and he encouraged me to keep reading.

I got through the second book, with much the same feeling as I had about the first.

And then I read the third book. And it was the third book that started to make it all make sense to me. The third book was the one where the plot really started to gel, where I realized these books were about more than a little kid with magic powers and cliched storylines (even though the storylines did remain cliched through most of the series). At very least, I started to get why people liked them.

I didn’t read the fourth book for a long time. I’m pretty sure the paperback wasn’t out yet when I read the first three, and so I waited for it to come out in paperback. Then I promptly forgot about its existence and went on with the rest of my life. I finally read it over two days at Christmas in 2002.

And then I went back to not really paying attention, even though I was totally and utterly fangirling Mad-Eye Moody. But then the fifth book was announced to come out while [info]haruspexy was in Italy, and had no way of getting the book. She was a huge fan, so I ordered it to be shipped to her for her birthday so she could read it. I ordered a copy for myself, too, but somehow the order didn’t go through and I only found out two days before the book’s release that I hadn’t actually ordered it after all.

I was going to a New Britain Rock Cats game that night, and I bought the book at the train station before heading up to see the game. I had spent the whole night awake roleplaying and was pretty much zonked– plus, it was raining and I was coming down with something. So rather than watch the game, I hid out in the management offices (the Rock Cats were partially owned by my dad’s boss) and read. I read all the way to where That Thing That Was a Giant Spoiler happened, and then promptly fell asleep on my book.

Then [info]pinkfinity contacted me about using one of my memes for Fiction Alley. And that was pretty much my first taste of fandom.

When the sixth book came out, I went to the local bookstore for the midnight release. In costume, because I happened to discover that that was what people were wont to do. By myself, because this was back when I was living in Cambridge. I dressed up as a wizard pretending to be a Muggle (a href=”http://www.antagonia.net/images/random/cowboy.jpg”>picture here). I had an awesome time and stayed up all night to read it. And then fell asleep. And got up and kept reading.

But in all this, I never really felt like part of the fandom. I was just reading the books because I I enjoyed the books, but they weren’t my favorite thing since sliced toast. I liked understanding jokes people were making on the internet, though.

And then, in the winter of 2005, when pretty much everything that could possibly go wrong in one person’s life happened all at once, I signed up for [info]hogwarts_elite out of curiosity. I signed up because one of my generator memes was getting tons of hits from inside the community, and I had to apply and get accepted to see why. So I did.

I wasn’t expecting to stay in. I was planning on just joining and seeing what they used my meme for, and leaving. But I was staying with my parents, and bored, and home a lot without anywhere to go, and H_E had art contests and writing contests, so I started participating.

And I started making friends. The first one I made was [info]rainy_day. Holy crap, Brenna, I love you. Then came [info]katieupsidedown, whom I also love. And then more and more and more. When I moved back into Manhattan in 2006, I started hanging out with [info]spiralstairs and then with [info]cacophonesque. I convinced [info]seori to join up, and though she didn’t stay around, [info]liret did.

I made some of my best friends because of Harry Potter. So for me, it doesn’t matter how good the books are. It doesn’t matter how many there are, or that the last of the movies is finally out for public consumption. It is amazing to have experienced this as a cultural phenomenon firsthand, but what is even more amazing is to have made some of the most wonderful friends, around the country and the world, because of a series of books. You are all incredible, every one of you.

Now that the sappy bit is over, I am going to talk about seeing the movie last night. Not in the sense of my feelings about what I liked and didn’t, but the whole experience of going.

I told my coworkers I was going to see it, and most of them didn’t know enough about the books for me to explain my costume– I explained myself as “an evil journalist.” I was wearing my dress, but not my wig, at work.

At the end of the day, I was talking to Clare, and I told her I was going, and she got super excited and asked who I was going as. I told her, and she was like “Oh, awesome!” And I was like, you actually know who Rita Skeeter is? And she was like, “of course I do!” So that made me happy.

I went home and changed, and Jess came over, and we futzed around a little and did our makeup, and then we went into the city. Jess had forgotten her credit card, so we went to the movie theater and asked what she could do about it. They told her that if they could see her the confirmation notice, it wouldn’t be a problem. I picked up tickets for me and Kate, and they gave us glasses.

We’d heard that they were giving out glasses than looked like Harry Potter’s glasses, but the ones they gave me were the regular Real 3D glasses. I was a little disappointed, but shrugged it off. Then Jess and I went to get some sushi for dinner. We passed some people hanging out on the street waiting for the movie, and one of them was dressed like Hagrid.

We got our sushi, and went back to the theater. There wasn’t anyone else waiting, so Jess and I headed over to a pub and got a couple pints. When we walked in, this one guy at the bar turned to us and was like, “okay, you just made my night.” He was also there for the movie and was just so exicted to see people in costume. So we chatted a bit, and he left, and then this other guy came over to chat with us– named Rich. Rich had never read any of the books, but he was a huge fan and had seen all the movies. He had made a deliberate choice to see all the movies first, and was planning on going out today to buy the books and finally read them. It was so cool! We asked him for his predictions and quite a lot of them were right.

Kate came over to the bar and had a beer with us, and then we went over to the theater, where– surprise! They HAD THE HARRY POTTER GLASSES AFTER ALL. So I have mine still in the plastic, joy!

I loved the Ziegfeld because it was just so stress-free to go in knowing where my seat was and not having to rush or worry about someone stealing it. However, Jess DID have a problem getting in and Kate and I had to leave and go vouch for her, but it all worked out and the manager was extra-nice and actually had an usher let us in a side door and show us to our seats, which made me feel all VIP-ish. I also got stopped by so many people who were totally excited about my costume, even though there was a dearth of people in costume there. Quite a lot of people in Hogwarts tee shirts, but not really many costumes, which disappointed me.

Kate and I went out to get popcorn and sodas, and Kate ran into her friend Erica, and we made plans to go out after the movie. Which we did– I dragged everyone to the pub I go to sometimes with my coworkers, because I know they have Goose Island on tap, and we chatted for a while, and then Kate was kind enough to drive me and Jess home.

I documented everything with my camera:

 

Love, love love.

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

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