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Scott Harris of Catoctin Creek Distillery came up to New York City this week to celebrate the New York launch of Catoctin Creek’s spirits line, and I tagged along with him to a bunch of his events!

cut for length! )

If you live in New York, or any of the other states where it is available make sure to try Catoctin Creek’s spirits!

Mirrored from Nommable!.

teaberryblue: (Vector Me!)

Scott Harris of Catoctin Creek Distillery came up to New York City this week to celebrate the New York launch of Catoctin Creek’s spirits line, and I tagged along with him to a bunch of his events!

One of my oldest friends, Emily, has been working for them, and introduced me to their liquor about a year ago– she poured a little bit of gin into a metal thermos for me to take home with me after a lovely brunch. I started experimenting with it right away– their gin is very friendly to folks who aren’t crazy about strong juniper flavors, with a really nice mix of different herbs that gives it a unique profile. In November, Scott and Emily invited me to go out for a drink with them, and then Scott did an impromptu tasting of the rest of their line– and sent me home with a bottle of each of their flagship spirits– Mosby’s Spirit, a white whiskey, Roundstone Rye, and the Watershed Gin I mentioned above.

Then I went down to the distillery in January and met Scott’s wife, Becky, and got to sit in on a special session where they taught us about the distillation process. I already knew a little bit about distilling, but this really improved my knowledge. I also got to play with their bottling line, which was INCREDIBLY AWESOME, and reminded me a lot of playing whack-a-mole, but with gin!

So I was delighted when Scott told me he was going to be in town and asked if I could come to come of his tastings. I met up with him first at the Rum House on Tuesday– but there was a bit of a miscommunication, so no tasting, but we got a drink and some deviled eggs and then went over to Noorman’s Kil, where we got delicious grilled cheeses and beer, and I got to meet Scott’s New York brand ambassador, Kirsten, who was super nice. They had a huge crowd show up to taste the rye. I don’t have photos from that, because it was super dark, but there were loads of very enthusiastic whiskey aficionados. It was getting close to my bedtime, though, so I headed home, and met up again the next day at the Brandy Library.

At the Brandy Library, we had all three of the spirits, and that was really fun– I actually tasted along with the crowd, sort of, except that I got caught up chatting with folks from Scott’s distributor a bit in the process so it took me a while between the rye and the gin, but I eventually got through all three of them. I had a couple really nice cocktails, and then Mayur, who teaches the classes I sometimes take at Amor Y Amargo and who is spearheading the spirits division at Scott’s distributor, showed up, and it was cool to chat with him when he wasn’t behind the bar. I took a whole bunch of photos of that tasting, and one of them ran in Scott’s local paper!

After the Brandy Library, Scott and Kirsten and I went over to Ward III to grab a drink, and then I went home because it was my bedtime!

Then, on Friday, Scott had a tasting at The Whiskey Shop. I’d never been there before– largely because it’s in Brooklyn and a touch out of the way for me to go to buy spirits, but this place is awesome and if you live nearby, I highly recommend going in. I spent most of the time chatting with Jon, the shopkeeper, who is incredibly knowledgeable and incredibly fun, and let me taste a couple of samples of different things.

The people who came into The Whiskey Shop were all really interesting people who wanted to converse about spirits, which was fun. I talked to a whole bunch of different people there about different things. Once that was over, Jon suggested we go to Kinfolk’s Yuji Ramen around the corner, which was a perfect, delicious little meal. It was a great end to the week. I had so much fun getting to see all these different tastings, how different people taste spirits, and the kinds of questions people asked.

If you live in New York, or any of the other states where it is available make sure to try Catoctin Creek’s spirits!

Mirrored from Nommable!.

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I made a ricotta-based gelato today, with a flavor reminiscent of cannoli filling.

 

 

The Richest Gelato
Recipe Type: Dessert
Author: Tea
Prep time: 5 mins
Cook time: 30 mins
Total time: 35 mins
Serves: 4-6
A velvety, rich gelato made with ricotta. This is extremely dense and you will only want a little bit!
Ingredients
  • 1 cup fresh ricotta
  • 1/4 cup cream or half & half
  • 1/8 cup Ramazzotti Amaro
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 tsp each lemon & orange zest
  • 2 egg yolks
Instructions
  1. Stir together ricotta, half & half & amaro until ricotta is smooth (no lumps)
  2. Add remaining ingredients and stir until eggs are fully incorporated
  3. Add to ice cream maker and mix according to ice cream maker instructions

This was so incredibly dense and thick and velvety smooth; I have never made a gelato like this before. I could inhale the whole thing, except that it’s too rich for that!!!

Mirrored from Nommable!.

teaberryblue: (Vector Me!)

I made a ricotta-based gelato today, with a flavor reminiscent of cannoli filling.

 

 

The Richest Gelato
Recipe Type: Dessert
Author: Tea
Prep time: 5 mins
Cook time: 30 mins
Total time: 35 mins
Serves: 4-6
A velvety, rich gelato made with ricotta. This is extremely dense and you will only want a little bit!
Ingredients
  • 1 cup fresh ricotta
  • 1/4 cup cream or half & half
  • 1/8 cup Ramazzotti Amaro
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 tsp each lemon & orange zest
  • 2 egg yolks
Instructions
  1. Stir together ricotta, half & half & amaro until ricotta is smooth (no lumps)
  2. Add remaining ingredients and stir until eggs are fully incorporated
  3. Add to ice cream maker and mix according to ice cream maker instructions

This was so incredibly dense and thick and velvety smooth; I have never made a gelato like this before. I could inhale the whole thing, except that it’s too rich for that!!!

Mirrored from Nommable!.

teaberryblue: (Default)

Lately, I’ve developed a fondness for homemade marshmallows. I’ve been making marshmallows on and off for a few years now, but never really started experimenting with them, although I Had Ideas.

Let me start with a secret: making marshmallows is easy. It is so ridiculously easy, and fairly reasonably-priced, and the results are so good, that if you have forty minutes to make them and don’t mind waiting overnight to have marshmallows, you might never buy store-bought marshmallows again.

I’m serious.

Basically, marshmallows are simple: you boil a mixture of 1 cup sugar, 1 cup corn syrup, 1/2 cup water, until it reaches about 250 degrees Fahrenheit on a candy thermometer. You pour the sugar solution into a blender where you have .75 oz of gelatin in another 1/2 cup water. The solution will foam up; you will turn the mixer on to its highest speed and mix for ten to fifteen minutes, at which point you will feel like Bartholomew Cubbins fighting off the Oobleck. You will coat a rubber spatula in margarine, which will make the Oobleck miraculously slide off the spatula, as you scrape it into a greased baking sheet lined with a mixture of 1/2 cornstarch, 1/2 confectioners’ sugar. You will let it sit overnight. In the morning, there are marshmallows. You can cut them apart with scissors, and then toss them in more sugar-cornstarch.

The basic trick to marshmallows is just to have a really good mixer. I destroyed two hand mixers making marshmallows, which had a lot to do with why I didn’t make them very often– but then, for Christmas this year, my parents gave me a standing mixer. And it makes a huge difference in the marshmallow-making process.

The thing with marshmallows is that they required heavy whipping for an extended period of time. So if you have a hand mixer, you had better have a book in the other hand or a television in the same room as your mixer. Or something. This is why having the standing mixer makes such a difference.

So once I got the mixer, I really started spending a lot of time playing with flavors. I started logically– infusing herbs in the sugar syrup, peppermint once, and lavender and tarragon another time. Then I moved on, realizing I could substitute some of the unflavored gelatin for Jell-o, and get day-glo marshmallows with delicious artificial candy flavors. Lately, I’ve been playing with boozemallows, and I’ve done three flavors that are all quite good: Angostura, Fernet-Branca, and Sazerac.

The Sazerac marshmallows were the first ones I made that actually approximate a cocktail instead of just having a bit of a specific ingredient flavoring the marshmallow. They’re very mild, but if you eat them alone, you can taste all the subtle flavors you expect from a Sazerac: whiskey, absinthe, and Peychaud’s, and they even have the tiniest tinge of pink to them (though it doesn’t come across much in the photo).

To the recipe I related above, I added about 1/4 cup Catoctin Creek Roundstone Rye, about 1/8 cup Tenneyson Absinthe, and about ten dashes of Peychaud’s bitters– I added these right at the beginning of the whipping process, into the mixer. Use a splash guard for your mixer if you have one. You can taste the marshmallow to see if you want more or less of any ingredient, and it’s easy to add a little bit more later on– as long as it’s not too much, it mixes in well.

Of course, once the marshmallows are done, I recommend popping a couple of them into a glass of whiskey.

Mirrored from Nommable!.

teaberryblue: (Vector Me!)

Lately, I’ve developed a fondness for homemade marshmallows. I’ve been making marshmallows on and off for a few years now, but never really started experimenting with them, although I Had Ideas.

Let me start with a secret: making marshmallows is easy. It is so ridiculously easy, and fairly reasonably-priced, and the results are so good, that if you have forty minutes to make them and don’t mind waiting overnight to have marshmallows, you might never buy store-bought marshmallows again.

I’m serious.

Basically, marshmallows are simple: you boil a mixture of 1 cup sugar, 1 cup corn syrup, 1/2 cup water, until it reaches about 250 degrees Fahrenheit on a candy thermometer. You pour the sugar solution into a blender where you have .75 oz of gelatin in another 1/2 cup water. The solution will foam up; you will turn the mixer on to its highest speed and mix for ten to fifteen minutes, at which point you will feel like Bartholomew Cubbins fighting off the Oobleck. You will coat a rubber spatula in margarine, which will make the Oobleck miraculously slide off the spatula, as you scrape it into a greased baking sheet lined with a mixture of 1/2 cornstarch, 1/2 confectioners’ sugar. You will let it sit overnight. In the morning, there are marshmallows. You can cut them apart with scissors, and then toss them in more sugar-cornstarch.

The basic trick to marshmallows is just to have a really good mixer. I destroyed two hand mixers making marshmallows, which had a lot to do with why I didn’t make them very often– but then, for Christmas this year, my parents gave me a standing mixer. And it makes a huge difference in the marshmallow-making process.

The thing with marshmallows is that they required heavy whipping for an extended period of time. So if you have a hand mixer, you had better have a book in the other hand or a television in the same room as your mixer. Or something. This is why having the standing mixer makes such a difference.

So once I got the mixer, I really started spending a lot of time playing with flavors. I started logically– infusing herbs in the sugar syrup, peppermint once, and lavender and tarragon another time. Then I moved on, realizing I could substitute some of the unflavored gelatin for Jell-o, and get day-glo marshmallows with delicious artificial candy flavors. Lately, I’ve been playing with boozemallows, and I’ve done three flavors that are all quite good: Angostura, Fernet-Branca, and Sazerac.

The Sazerac marshmallows were the first ones I made that actually approximate a cocktail instead of just having a bit of a specific ingredient flavoring the marshmallow. They’re very mild, but if you eat them alone, you can taste all the subtle flavors you expect from a Sazerac: whiskey, absinthe, and Peychaud’s, and they even have the tiniest tinge of pink to them (though it doesn’t come across much in the photo).

To the recipe I related above, I added about 1/4 cup Catoctin Creek Roundstone Rye, about 1/8 cup Tenneyson Absinthe, and about ten dashes of Peychaud’s bitters– I added these right at the beginning of the whipping process, into the mixer. Use a splash guard for your mixer if you have one. You can taste the marshmallow to see if you want more or less of any ingredient, and it’s easy to add a little bit more later on– as long as it’s not too much, it mixes in well.

Of course, once the marshmallows are done, I recommend popping a couple of them into a glass of whiskey.

Mirrored from Nommable!.

teaberryblue: (Default)

Margarita (And Ginger Margarita)
Recipe Type: Cocktail
Author: Tea
This is how I make a traditional Margarita, plus a little twist on it!
Ingredients
  • 2 oz white/silver tequila
  • 1/2 oz Cointreau
  • Juice from 1 lime
  • 1/2 oz Domaine de Canton (optional)
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp evaporated cane juice (or sugar)
Instructions
  1. Mix first four ingredients
  2. Mix sugar and salt together on a plate. Shake the plate until it is even.
  3. Take a chilled margarita or martini glass and wipe the used lime over the edge. (see picture)
  4. Turn the glass upside down on the plate and girve the glass a spin until the salt mixture sticks to the rim.
  5. Right the glass and pour in the cocktail! Yum!

 

Mirrored from Nommable!.

teaberryblue: (Vector Me!)

Margarita (And Ginger Margarita)
Recipe Type: Cocktail
Author: Tea
This is how I make a traditional Margarita, plus a little twist on it!
Ingredients
  • 2 oz white/silver tequila
  • 1/2 oz Cointreau
  • Juice from 1 lime
  • 1/2 oz Domaine de Canton (optional)
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp evaporated cane juice (or sugar)
Instructions
  1. Mix first four ingredients
  2. Mix sugar and salt together on a plate. Shake the plate until it is even.
  3. Take a chilled margarita or martini glass and wipe the used lime over the edge. (see picture)
  4. Turn the glass upside down on the plate and girve the glass a spin until the salt mixture sticks to the rim.
  5. Right the glass and pour in the cocktail! Yum!

 

Mirrored from Nommable!.

teaberryblue: (Default)

When I was a little girl, my mother was one of those Kitchen Goddess moms, the ones who made ten or twelve kinds of cookies for Christmas, as well as fudge and sometimes some other candies. Christmastime, or the time leading up to Christmas, was an absolutely magical time for me, and I would arrive home from school every day to discover new delicacies stored neatly in containers and tins, new smells wafting from every corner. But the best part was that once school was over for the day and homework was done, it was time to help. There was something even more magical about practicing the alchemy that created the treats we would serve and give away to friends and family.

Now, we’ve cut back quite a lot. We don’t have big parties or huge family get-togethers anymore, and for the most part, we don’t really miss them. But there are a few kinds of cookies that we make every year, no matter what, although maybe in smaller quantities than we made when I was a child. (There is a note on one recipe, hand-written by my mother, from the year I graduated high school: 1996, 6 recipes= 375 cookies.) These are the cookies that make Christmas Christmas for me. They don’t really make an appearance the rest of the year, but at Christmastime, they are on every tray. They might not be the shiniest or prettiest or most colorful cookies, but they’re the ones that taste the best, or remind me the most of happy family times.

The cookbook shows above is the 1966 Woman’s Day Cookie Cookbook. It’s torn apart (missing the back cover), dogeared, yellowed, and covered in ballpoint-pen-notes. We don’t use it for much, apart from one very special recipe.

my adaptation of the recipe underneath the cut )

Mirrored from Nommable!.

teaberryblue: (Vector Me!)

When I was a little girl, my mother was one of those Kitchen Goddess moms, the ones who made ten or twelve kinds of cookies for Christmas, as well as fudge and sometimes some other candies. Christmastime, or the time leading up to Christmas, was an absolutely magical time for me, and I would arrive home from school every day to discover new delicacies stored neatly in containers and tins, new smells wafting from every corner. But the best part was that once school was over for the day and homework was done, it was time to help. There was something even more magical about practicing the alchemy that created the treats we would serve and give away to friends and family.

Now, we’ve cut back quite a lot. We don’t have big parties or huge family get-togethers anymore, and for the most part, we don’t really miss them. But there are a few kinds of cookies that we make every year, no matter what, although maybe in smaller quantities than we made when I was a child. (There is a note on one recipe, hand-written by my mother, from the year I graduated high school: 1996, 6 recipes= 375 cookies.) These are the cookies that make Christmas Christmas for me. They don’t really make an appearance the rest of the year, but at Christmastime, they are on every tray. They might not be the shiniest or prettiest or most colorful cookies, but they’re the ones that taste the best, or remind me the most of happy family times.

The cookbook shows above is the 1966 Woman’s Day Cookie Cookbook. It’s torn apart (missing the back cover), dogeared, yellowed, and covered in ballpoint-pen-notes. We don’t use it for much, apart from one very special recipe.

Pecan Butterballs, adapted from Women’s Day Cookie Cookbook, 1966
Recipe Type: Cookie
Author: Tea
Prep time: 20 mins
Cook time: 25 mins
Total time: 45 mins
These are one of my favorite cookies to make at holiday times. Light, buttery and not too sweet.
Ingredients
  • 2 cups sifted flour
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 cup butter
  • 2 tsp vanilla
  • 2 cups finely chopped pecans
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
Instructions
  1. Let butter soften– do not melt.
  2. Mix flour, sugar, salt, and vanilla in a mixer at lowest speed until well-blended.
  3. Cut soft butter into tablespoon-sized rectangles. Add pieces to dry mixture a few at a time and mix well.
  4. Once all butter is in mixture, set mixer to medium speed and mix until everything is well-blended.
  5. Add pecans, a cup at a time, to mixture and blend in well.
  6. Roll dough into 1″ spheres and put on ungreased cookie sheets.
  7. Cook for 25 minutes at 325 degrees Fahrenheit.
  8. Take off tray immediately– cookies will be very soft, so work carefully or they will crumble in your hands.
  9. Leave to cool several hours, preferably overnight.
  10. Put about 2 dozen cookies at a time in a large bowl.
  11. Sift powdered sugar over cookies, then stir cookies around with hands until well-coated.
  12. Store in cookie tins with layers of wax paper between.
Notes

This recipe makes about 50 cookies. I tend to make two recipes or more.


Mirrored from Nommable!.

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Cocktail Recipe: Basic Black


Recipe Type: Cocktail

Author: Tea

Prep time: 4 mins

Total time: 4 mins

Serves: 1

This drink uses Baladin Spuma Nera, which is a delicious Italian soda.

Ingredients


  • 2 oz Eagle Rare Bourbon

  • 1 oz Cointreau

  • 1/2 fresh ripe pluot

  • 4 basil leaves

  • Baladin's Spuma Nera

  • 1 dash Bittermen's Grapefruit Bitters


Instructions



  1. Tear pluot into small pieces and add to shaker with ice.

  2. Add bourbon, Cointrea, pluot, and basil

  3. Muddle well until pluot is nicely pulped

  4. Shake

  5. Strain into a rocks glass

  6. Top with Spuma Nera

  7. Add bitters







 

notes

Eagle Rare is relatively easy to find. If you cant find it, any quality bourbon will do. I recommend one on the drier side, like Woodford Reserve.
Cointreau is an orange liqueur that is very easy to find, but a touch pricey if you're jut starting out. If the price tag scares you, pick up a bottle of Citronge or even plain old Triple Sec.
Baladin's Spuma Nera is a soda that tastes like an amaro. It is likely to be hard to find. Try an Italian food store. If not, my recommendation would be to just add .5 oz of an amaro (probably Ramazzotti for this one) and use plain club soda.
Bittermen's Grapefruit Bitters might be tricky to find. Replace with any citrus-flavored bitters.


I posted another cocktail recipe on Nommable today! Read it here. It's a drink with vodka and apricot!
teaberryblue: (Default)



Cocktail Recipe: Basic Black


Recipe Type: Cocktail

Author: Tea

Prep time: 4 mins

Total time: 4 mins

Serves: 1

This drink uses Baladin Spuma Nera, which is a delicious Italian soda.

Ingredients


  • 2 oz Eagle Rare Bourbon

  • 1 oz Cointreau

  • 1/2 fresh ripe pluot

  • 4 basil leaves

  • Baladin's Spuma Nera

  • 1 dash Bittermen's Grapefruit Bitters


Instructions



  1. Tear pluot into small pieces and add to shaker with ice.

  2. Add bourbon, Cointrea, pluot, and basil

  3. Muddle well until pluot is nicely pulped

  4. Shake

  5. Strain into a rocks glass

  6. Top with Spuma Nera

  7. Add bitters







 

notes

Eagle Rare is relatively easy to find. If you cant find it, any quality bourbon will do. I recommend one on the drier side, like Woodford Reserve.
Cointreau is an orange liqueur that is very easy to find, but a touch pricey if you're jut starting out. If the price tag scares you, pick up a bottle of Citronge or even plain old Triple Sec.
Baladin's Spuma Nera is a soda that tastes like an amaro. It is likely to be hard to find. Try an Italian food store. If not, my recommendation would be to just add .5 oz of an amaro (probably Ramazzotti for this one) and use plain club soda.
Bittermen's Grapefruit Bitters might be tricky to find. Replace with any citrus-flavored bitters.


I posted another cocktail recipe on Nommable today! Read it here. It's a drink with vodka and apricot!
teaberryblue: (Default)



Cocktail Recipe: Basic Black


Recipe Type: Cocktail

Author: Tea

Prep time: 4 mins

Total time: 4 mins

Serves: 1

This drink uses Baladin Spuma Nera, which is a delicious Italian soda.

Ingredients


  • 2 oz Eagle Rare Bourbon

  • 1 oz Cointreau

  • 1/2 fresh ripe pluot

  • 4 basil leaves

  • Baladin's Spuma Nera

  • 1 dash Bittermen's Grapefruit Bitters


Instructions



  1. Tear pluot into small pieces and add to shaker with ice.

  2. Add bourbon, Cointrea, pluot, and basil

  3. Muddle well until pluot is nicely pulped

  4. Shake

  5. Strain into a rocks glass

  6. Top with Spuma Nera

  7. Add bitters







 

notes

Eagle Rare is relatively easy to find. If you cant find it, any quality bourbon will do. I recommend one on the drier side, like Woodford Reserve.
Cointreau is an orange liqueur that is very easy to find, but a touch pricey if you're jut starting out. If the price tag scares you, pick up a bottle of Citronge or even plain old Triple Sec.
Baladin's Spuma Nera is a soda that tastes like an amaro. It is likely to be hard to find. Try an Italian food store. If not, my recommendation would be to just add .5 oz of an amaro (probably Ramazzotti for this one) and use plain club soda.
Bittermen's Grapefruit Bitters might be tricky to find. Replace with any citrus-flavored bitters.


I posted another cocktail recipe on Nommable today! Read it here. It's a drink with vodka and apricot!
teaberryblue: (Default)

We don’t often cook from recipes at The Fougner Farm, but this week, my mother tried two recipes from two different magazines.

On Friday night, we had a Grilled Striped Bass with Indian-Spiced Tomato Salad from the August 2011 Food And Wine. The recipe is here.

The striped bass was pretty conventional, although delicious. The tomatoes were seasoned in a way that I hadn’t really ever considered seasoning fresh ripe tomatoes before, and it was a nice surprise– really excellent. The oil/spice/tomato juice at the bottom of the bowl made an excellent dressing for the fish. We ate it with rice and cole slaw (which doesn’t really go, but we were cutting up some cabbage for the chickens). The tomatoes are definitely worth a repeat.

On Saturday, we made the cover recipe from Bon Appetit‘s July 2011 “Grilling Issue,” the Salt & Pepper Bone-In Ribeyes. I can’t find that recipe on the BA or Epicurious website, so I suspect they have a delay before posting new recipes.


We had it with a steakhouse-style salad following in the pattern of the signature salads at Bryant & Cooper– chopped tomatoes, green beans, gorgonzola, bacon, and a little thyme in oil and vinegar. We marinated the beans for a while. The Bryant & Cooper salad also has shrimp on it, we didn’t do the shrimp as it is a bit much. We also had grilled corn on the cob with a pink-peppercorn and sea salt butter and some fresh raw cucumbers.

The steaks were delicious but my mother found that, having followed the magazine instructions exactly, her medium rare steak was not as rare as she likes it. My rare steak was excellent and cooked perfectly. The steaks on the magazine cover are garnished with grilled scallions, although there isn’t a recipe for these inside the magazine. We made them anyway and they were delicous.

Cooking from recipes is fun because I always find that I learn techniques that I might not have thought of on my own, or food/seasoning combinations that go outside the flavor profiles that I normally think of. However, I suspect out of these recipes, we will probably use the tomatoes again but not necessarily the grilling techniques. The steaks were so lightly seasoned that I wouldn’t quite consider that a recipe.

If you read Nommable on my LJ, please also take the time to read [livejournal.com profile] gildedage's recipe, Sunday Morning Scramble! Yum!

Mirrored from Nommable!.

teaberryblue: (Vector Me!)

We don’t often cook from recipes at The Fougner Farm, but this week, my mother tried two recipes from two different magazines.

On Friday night, we had a Grilled Striped Bass with Indian-Spiced Tomato Salad from the August 2011 Food And Wine. The recipe is here.

The striped bass was pretty conventional, although delicious. The tomatoes were seasoned in a way that I hadn’t really ever considered seasoning fresh ripe tomatoes before, and it was a nice surprise– really excellent. The oil/spice/tomato juice at the bottom of the bowl made an excellent dressing for the fish. We ate it with rice and cole slaw (which doesn’t really go, but we were cutting up some cabbage for the chickens). The tomatoes are definitely worth a repeat.

On Saturday, we made the cover recipe from Bon Appetit‘s July 2011 “Grilling Issue,” the Salt & Pepper Bone-In Ribeyes. I can’t find that recipe on the BA or Epicurious website, so I suspect they have a delay before posting new recipes.


We had it with a steakhouse-style salad following in the pattern of the signature salads at Bryant & Cooper– chopped tomatoes, green beans, gorgonzola, bacon, and a little thyme in oil and vinegar. We marinated the beans for a while. The Bryant & Cooper salad also has shrimp on it, we didn’t do the shrimp as it is a bit much. We also had grilled corn on the cob with a pink-peppercorn and sea salt butter and some fresh raw cucumbers.

The steaks were delicious but my mother found that, having followed the magazine instructions exactly, her medium rare steak was not as rare as she likes it. My rare steak was excellent and cooked perfectly. The steaks on the magazine cover are garnished with grilled scallions, although there isn’t a recipe for these inside the magazine. We made them anyway and they were delicous.

Cooking from recipes is fun because I always find that I learn techniques that I might not have thought of on my own, or food/seasoning combinations that go outside the flavor profiles that I normally think of. However, I suspect out of these recipes, we will probably use the tomatoes again but not necessarily the grilling techniques. The steaks were so lightly seasoned that I wouldn’t quite consider that a recipe.

Mirrored from Nommable!.

teaberryblue: (Default)

I bought my mother a bottle of G’Vine Nouaison this week and we went through pretty much the whole bottle over the course of one weekend, which we rarely do because usually I make drinks with completely different ingredients every day, but this was just so good with herbs that I kept playing around with it.

There is also a special quiz question for you today: What do the names of all these drinks have in common?

1) Dig Ophelia

Ingredients
2.5 oz G’Vine Nouaison
.5 oz Bo Nardini Rue Grappa
.25 oz St. Germain
5 sprigs lavender
1 tsp honey
2 dashes Fee Bros Grapefruit Bitters

Instructions
Add gin, grappa, and lavender to shaker, muddle
Coat chilled cocktail glass with St. Germain
Add honey to shaker and shake
Strain into glass and add bitters

2) Citizen Charlotte

Ingredients
2.5 oz G’Vine Nouaison
.5 oz Etrog Citron Liqueur
.25 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth
1 Tb thyme
1/2 of a garlic scape

Instructions
Chop scape into 1/2″ chunks
Put all ingredients except vermouth in shaker, muddle
Coat cocktail glass with vermouth
Shake contents of shaker and strain into glass!

3) Dalton Trumbo

Note: I used wild black caps for this drink. If you can’t get black caps, regular raspberries are probably the best suitable replacement. Here’s a picture of black caps in case you live somewhere where wild berries are plentiful:

So that is what is in the drink!

Ingredients
3 oz G’Vine Nouaison
4 sprigs of oregano plus one for garnish
5 black caps plus 2 for garnis
1 tsp honey

Instructions
1) Put all ingredients in shaker, muddle until berries are well-crushed and gin is bright pink.
2) Shake and strain into chilled cocktail glass
3) Garnish with oregano and additional berries

Thank you to [info]gildedage who is my new official Drink Entitler Person.

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

teaberryblue: (Default)

I bought my mother a bottle of G’Vine Nouaison this week and we went through pretty much the whole bottle over the course of one weekend, which we rarely do because usually I make drinks with completely different ingredients every day, but this was just so good with herbs that I kept playing around with it.

There is also a special quiz question for you today: What do the names of all these drinks have in common?

1) Dig Ophelia

Ingredients
2.5 oz G’Vine Nouaison
.5 oz Bo Nardini Rue Grappa
.25 oz St. Germain
5 sprigs lavender
1 tsp honey
2 dashes Fee Bros Grapefruit Bitters

Instructions
Add gin, grappa, and lavender to shaker, muddle
Coat chilled cocktail glass with St. Germain
Add honey to shaker and shake
Strain into glass and add bitters

2) Citizen Charlotte

Ingredients
2.5 oz G’Vine Nouaison
.5 oz Etrog Citron Liqueur
.25 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth
1 Tb thyme
1/2 of a garlic scape

Instructions
Chop scape into 1/2″ chunks
Put all ingredients except vermouth in shaker, muddle
Coat cocktail glass with vermouth
Shake contents of shaker and strain into glass!

3) Dalton Trumbo

Note: I used wild black caps for this drink. If you can’t get black caps, regular raspberries are probably the best suitable replacement. Here’s a picture of black caps in case you live somewhere where wild berries are plentiful:

So that is what is in the drink!

Ingredients
3 oz G’Vine Nouaison
4 sprigs of oregano plus one for garnish
5 black caps plus 2 for garnis
1 tsp honey

Instructions
1) Put all ingredients in shaker, muddle until berries are well-crushed and gin is bright pink.
2) Shake and strain into chilled cocktail glass
3) Garnish with oregano and additional berries

Thank you to [info]gildedage who is my new official Drink Entitler Person.

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

teaberryblue: (Default)

Or, you know, five. Which is how many new ones that are worth sharing I’ve made since the last time I did a cocktail post apart from the strawberries. Holy heck! How did I go that long? What is wrong with me?!

I am feeling uncreative and beyond naming things right now. Which you may have noticed from my last post where I just started naming things “strawberry” in different languages. I figure the options right now are 1) sit around naming them for the next hundred years or 2) just throw ‘em up without names. If you want to volunteer names, go for it!

1)

Ingredients
2 1/2 oz Small’s Gin
1/2 oz Scarborough Faire Gin (homemade infusion! I make it with Gale Force Gin and 1/2 cup each parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme)
2 sprigs oregano
1 small plum,
1/2 oz lavender syrup
1/4 oz Branca Menta

Instructions
Add cut up plum, 1 sprig oregano and regular gin to shaker.
Muddle, then add Scarborough Faire gin & syrup. Shake.
Coat chilled cocktail glass with Branca Menta, discard excess.
Pour drink into glass, add oregano for garnish.

2)

Ingredients
2 oz Magellan Blue Gin
1 oz Carpano Antica Formula
1/2 oz limoncello
1 rib rhubarb plus a small piece of rhubarb for garnish
1 Tb lemon thyme
3 dashes Fee Bros Rhubarb bitters

Instructions
Add gin, thyme and chopped rhubarb to shaker, muddle well
Add Carpano Antica & limoncello and shake
Pour into chilled cocktail glass and add bitters
Garnish with leftover piece of rhubarb!

3)

Ingredients
2 oz Dogfish Head Jin
1oz Dolin dry vermouth
1/2oz Domaine de Canton
1Tb purple basil + 1 leaf for garnish
1Tsp Vietnamese coriander (this is different from your more typical coriander/cilantro and has broad, flat, shiny leaves) +1 leaf for garnish
1 hot pickled pepper
1/8 tsp cinnamon
Bottle Green Ginger & Lemongrass Soda to top

Instructions
Soak pepper in gin for five minutes.
Add gin (with pepper), basil, lemongrass, and Domaine de Canton to shaker, muddle.
Add vermouth & cinnamon, shake
Pour into highball glass with ice, add soda until glass is full. Garnish with leaves.

4)

Ingredients
2 1/2 oz Ethereal Gin
1/2 oz Averna amaro,
1/2 oz Heering Cherry Liqueur
10 bruised sage leaves (Bruise the sage leaves by running your index finger and thumb in opposite directions against the leaf)

Instructions
Put all ingredients in a glass. Muddle, then shake.
Strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Easy!

5)

Okay, I have to say, this is the best drink of the bunch. And it’s vodka. Vodka! My mother wanted a drink to showcase our new honey, so this is seriously made with honey RIGHT out of the hive. How awesome is that? But you should all try it. I recommend a lighter honey. Clover is probably fine, or acacia or tupelo.

Ingredients
3oz Comb Vodka
1/4 oz Mathilde peche
1/2 oz freshly extracted honey (any honey will do if you are not a nerd like me)
1 tb fresh lavender plus a sprig of lavender blossom for garnish
2 tb fresh mint.

Instructions
Add vodka, lavender and mint to shaker, muddle just until leaves are bruised.
Add honey and shake.
Coat chilled cocktail glass with Mathilde peche
Pour drink into glass, garnish.

Whew, okay, now I am caught up with the drinky-drinks.

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

teaberryblue: (Default)

Or, you know, five. Which is how many new ones that are worth sharing I’ve made since the last time I did a cocktail post apart from the strawberries. Holy heck! How did I go that long? What is wrong with me?!

I am feeling uncreative and beyond naming things right now. Which you may have noticed from my last post where I just started naming things “strawberry” in different languages. I figure the options right now are 1) sit around naming them for the next hundred years or 2) just throw ‘em up without names. If you want to volunteer names, go for it!

1)

Ingredients
2 1/2 oz Small’s Gin
1/2 oz Scarborough Faire Gin (homemade infusion! I make it with Gale Force Gin and 1/2 cup each parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme)
2 sprigs oregano
1 small plum,
1/2 oz lavender syrup
1/4 oz Branca Menta

Instructions
Add cut up plum, 1 sprig oregano and regular gin to shaker.
Muddle, then add Scarborough Faire gin & syrup. Shake.
Coat chilled cocktail glass with Branca Menta, discard excess.
Pour drink into glass, add oregano for garnish.

2)

Ingredients
2 oz Magellan Blue Gin
1 oz Carpano Antica Formula
1/2 oz limoncello
1 rib rhubarb plus a small piece of rhubarb for garnish
1 Tb lemon thyme
3 dashes Fee Bros Rhubarb bitters

Instructions
Add gin, thyme and chopped rhubarb to shaker, muddle well
Add Carpano Antica & limoncello and shake
Pour into chilled cocktail glass and add bitters
Garnish with leftover piece of rhubarb!

3)

Ingredients
2 oz Dogfish Head Jin
1oz Dolin dry vermouth
1/2oz Domaine de Canton
1Tb purple basil + 1 leaf for garnish
1Tsp Vietnamese coriander (this is different from your more typical coriander/cilantro and has broad, flat, shiny leaves) +1 leaf for garnish
1 hot pickled pepper
1/8 tsp cinnamon
Bottle Green Ginger & Lemongrass Soda to top

Instructions
Soak pepper in gin for five minutes.
Add gin (with pepper), basil, lemongrass, and Domaine de Canton to shaker, muddle.
Add vermouth & cinnamon, shake
Pour into highball glass with ice, add soda until glass is full. Garnish with leaves.

4)

Ingredients
2 1/2 oz Ethereal Gin
1/2 oz Averna amaro,
1/2 oz Heering Cherry Liqueur
10 bruised sage leaves (Bruise the sage leaves by running your index finger and thumb in opposite directions against the leaf)

Instructions
Put all ingredients in a glass. Muddle, then shake.
Strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Easy!

5)

Okay, I have to say, this is the best drink of the bunch. And it’s vodka. Vodka! My mother wanted a drink to showcase our new honey, so this is seriously made with honey RIGHT out of the hive. How awesome is that? But you should all try it. I recommend a lighter honey. Clover is probably fine, or acacia or tupelo.

Ingredients
3oz Comb Vodka
1/4 oz Mathilde peche
1/2 oz freshly extracted honey (any honey will do if you are not a nerd like me)
1 tb fresh lavender plus a sprig of lavender blossom for garnish
2 tb fresh mint.

Instructions
Add vodka, lavender and mint to shaker, muddle just until leaves are bruised.
Add honey and shake.
Coat chilled cocktail glass with Mathilde peche
Pour drink into glass, garnish.

Whew, okay, now I am caught up with the drinky-drinks.

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

teaberryblue: (Default)

We’ve been growing strawberries for a couple of years now, but somehow, some way, this year, they have completely outgrown our expectations!

Here’s our nifty little strawberry patch:

They are covered, as you can see, with a little tent of netting that is high enough for people to go inside to pick the berries, and also high enough to keep birds away from all but the berries very, very close to the outer perimeter. We still get some slugs this way, but it is the best way to keep your berries from being eaten before you get to do the eating! Notice also that the wide netting means that bees can get in to pollinate! They are good at that.

When the strawberries are ripe, you go under the netting and pick them. Here’s a ripe strawberry along with some not-yet-ripe ones!

So pretty and red!

So far, we are getting tons of strawberries this year:

We got about 3-4 quarts the first week of strawberry picking, and 4-5 quarts the second. And they are big and ripe and juicy. We’ve had strawberries for a couple years now, and each week, we’re getting as many strawberries as we’ve ever gotten in a year before, which is pretty exciting!

We made a whole lot of things with strawberries in them! For two weekends!

so many strawberry foods are under the cut! )

That is the end of the strawberry adventure! FOR NOW!

Mirrored from Antagonia.net.

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July 2015

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